CentOS 7: Upgrading from CentOS 6.x In Place

One of the newest things added to CentOS 7 is the capability to do an in place upgrade of CentOS 6.x to CentOS 7. In the past, the only official method of upgrading major versions of CentOS was to wipe and reinstall everything. Having said that, there were always processes you could follow with varying levels of success (based on straying from the official repositories and how customized your setup and package list was). We have run through this process now about a half dozen times, with varying levels of success, so let’s talk about some of the successes and failures.
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Linux Penguin

Changing MySQL User Password

Alright, so you’ve created a new MySQL Database, you’ve added a user, even granted permissions to the user. Yet, that user forgot the password to their MySQL user account. How do you change the user’s password? There are several ways to do this, one of which we can do without even entering the MySQL command console. This quick tutorial will show you three separate ways to change a MySQL user password

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linuxpineheadonly

Configuring A Fresh Install Of MySQL On CentOS: Start Service, Set Password, Set Runlevels

On some distributions, MySQL is installed without asking you to set the default root password for the MySQL server. If you’re running Debian or Ubuntu, the MySQL install will prompt you to create your password. However, some distributions such as CentOS aren’t as friendly. When MySQL is first installed on CentOS, it finishes without any user interaction. In fact, it finishes without a set root password, without starting the MySQL service, and without configuring the MySQL service to start on system reboot/boot.
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